The Isolated Beauty of Monhegan Island

How could a rocky little crag of an Island ten miles from the nearest mainland and scarcely a square mile in area be such a tourist attraction – especially with boat tickets costing $32 round trip each?  We were about to find out.

The ferry dock was only a few miles from our campground and just past the site of our lobster debacle of only a few days early – not the best reminder before you head out into high seas. But we got past it as we had gotten a late start and were really hauling hard to get to the dock before the boat left without us. When we got there, Vic jumped out to get tickets while I tried to figure out where to park without getting towed or worse without our new car rolling into the lake while we enjoyed ourselves at the island.

The ferry ride usually takes about an hour to pass by beautiful scenic vistas and wildlife in the bay. Today through bouncing swells we maneuvered around working lobstermen hauling up their catch, a couple porpoises out for a morning swim and dozens of birds feeding on the mid-morning insects.

Once we arrived in the harbor at Monhegan, we quickly realized what the fuss is all about. This isolated little fishing town, high atop the crags, is a place time has forgotten. Photos in the museum at the top of the hill show aerial images that differ very little from 1909 to today.

But, that’s what makes this place charming. No paved roads, friendly locals and 360 degrees of inspirational beauty all make you feel like you’re a part of this island. You’re no different than the woman who runs the grocery on the island and no less an islander than the guy selling boat tours. You really start to feel like you live here.

For just over four hours, we visited every store on our way up the mountain, hiked through the many under-maintained walking trails and visited the island’s lighthouse and museum. On one end of the island, in Lobster Bay, you can see the power of the ocean in the rusted, but largely untouched remains of the 1948 shipwreck of the D.T. Sheridan who was thrown against the rocks in the dense fog. Neither Victoria or I have ever seen a shipwreck up close, so we spent some time in and around the rocks getting pictures.

But this place is all about its beauty, so much of our time was spent taking photographs and just enjoying the amazing views. Here’s a few of our favorite images.